Thursday, February 25, 2010

Out of Arizona



One of these days I may write a novel. Or maybe just a meditation book with photos from our time here and reflections. One of my favorite photos is this one of the rainbow, taken from our backyard. I have photos of sunsets and ground squirrels and monsoon rains. All striking, the beauty of this place. Regardless I'll call it "Out of Arizona." It will begin something like:

"I once lived in a house in the mountains of Arizona, amongst pecan orchards, swirling dragonfly's and flitting hummingbirds.The days were dry, sunny, and sometimes scorching hot. An occasional life-giving rain became a sign of hope in an otherwise parched place"

As my husband and I prepare to drive out of here on Thursday we count our losses: income, home, car (yes, still waiting to see if Volkswagen will fix our Passat), furniture that won't fit in the truck that we had to load ourselves and now, will drive ourselves. We will leave one child here, going to school and living with family friends, until our lives stabilize. It's hard to leave him behind, but we all agree it's the right thing. We will miss the wildlife and the view out our back yard. I'll miss waking up to the sun rising over the mountains, which I can see through the window near my bed.

We head into an unknown future. Hoping for hope.

My dream the other night: I was trying to get to an interview. I walked over precipices and hills, down stairs, and into a crossway that suddenly became flooded with rushing water. To cross over from one side to another I had to surf on this boomerang shaped board. Of course the board tipped as the rushing water hit it and I fell in. I walked out of the water thinking, "I will just have to go to this interview soaking wet and hope for the best."

Rising up from this parched and prickly place I go off baptized in waters that can heal or drown. Only time will tell which it will be for me.

Monday, February 22, 2010

Both Sides, Now




In the early 1970's, when I was in high school, I listened to Joni Mitchell. I loved her "Blue" album, in particular. Somewhere along the way, while in college I think, I drifted away from her and don't even have any of her music on my iPod. That is until I woke up with this song in my head.

I'm thinking that maybe I've rounded the bend as I move into my last few days in Arizona. Pointing my inner compass northeast,I'm trying to look at both sides. The side that contains all the hopes and dreams that brought me here, the side that holds my hopes and dreams for returning to Chicago, and the side that holds my hopes and dreams for the future.

More than both sides, I'm trying to see all sides...but mostly,through all the hopes and dreams, I'm trying to see through the illusions, to see clearly this time, or as clear as one can.

I'm also thinking about love. I'm thinking that my time here was like a love affair gone bad. No one knew, at it's inception, at the infatuation phase, that it would turn sour. But in reality most of my time here felt like a lover doing everything possible to please the loved, to no avail. Every effort was a misfire, a misstep, misinterpreted, misunderstood. Paths crossing at odds with one another. A love affair that failed.

It happens sometimes, that people are just not made for one another, regardless of the hopes and dreams. And so we have to let the relationship go, wish the other well.

Yesterday I told Back in the Saddle Church that I did not intend to fall in love with them. It was my last Sunday with them, and it was clear that we love each other. It just happened, a brief, unexpected delightful love. A healing and restorative love. They celebrated me and gifted me and wished me well. I celebrated them and thanked them and wished them well. A love that reminds me what it is when relationships work.

I've worked for five churches in my ministry and only one of them was a failed love affair. That gives me hope.

Both sides, all sides, now.

Saturday, February 20, 2010

Chaos

I moved two years ago. Now, in a curious, perhaps organic, symmetry, I am moving again, in the same week, but reverse direction. The last move happened quickly, involved a lot of travel back and forth to new location, was very hectic and filled with chaos. I should have seen that as a sign of what was to come.

Now, as we are in the final days of packing, one could say that our house is in complete chaos. Boxes everywhere. Shredded paper all over the floor. Empty cabinets, and a garage in the midst of a staging ground for the moving truck on Wed.

But the reality is, despite how the house looks, this move is much more organized. I have had the time to go through our files and shred things that should have been shredded before our last move: 11 year old bills and bank statements, checks from an account we closed 5 years ago. Stuff, that in the haste and chaos of the last move, got packed and came with. Now all those files have been shredded. I will be moving two near empty file cabinets and several fewer boxes of paper. And, all that shredded paper has been used as filler in boxes. Note, shredded paper does not cushion items, so it's only good to fill empty space to keep boxes from collapsing.

In this move I have also recycled or donated to the resale shop almost everything that I've gotten rid of. I have hardly thrown away anything. I feel good about that.

So now we are on the last leg of packing and preparing. Everything looks like chaos but it's not. It's careful, thoughtful, organized.

I hope that bodes well for what comes next.

Friday, February 19, 2010

RevGals Friday Five: Spring into Lent

Sophia offers this RevGals Friday Five Meme on Lent an Spring:

1. Did you celebrate Mardi Gras/Shrove Tuesday this year? Any memories of memorable celebrations past? We did not celebrate either this year...at least we did not eat pancakes at church. I think we had some delicious grilled chicken. My most memorable Shrove Tuesday was the year we hosted a pasta dinner at church and sponsored the speaker from the refugee ministry who helped us develop our ministry with refugees.

2. How about Ash Wednesday, past and/or present? At small church Ash Wed. became a deeply mystical time as the church was transformed from silver and brass to wood, candles, rocks (to build prayer cairns), and bare branches and twigs instead of plants and flowers. It spoke deeply of journey, of simplicity, of desert, of earth in winter waiting to burst forth into new life.

3. Does your denomination or congregation celebrate "this joyful season"? Any special emphases or practices to share? Lent is my favorite season in the church year. I love the deeply reflective tone.

4. Do you have a personal plan of give-ups, take-ons, special ministries, and/or a special focus for your own spiritual growth between now and Easter? This year, as I did two years ago, I am packing and moving during Lent. It is literally a time of journey and hopefully transformation and new life.

5. What is your dream for the image of Christ coming to perfection in you, the church, the world? How can we support you in prayer? My dream is to continue growing my prayer life deeper and to walk with individuals and faith communities on their journey. In the end I hope we all grow in our compassion, our willingness to be gentle with others and gracious in our love.

Bonus: Song, prayer, picture, etc. that sums up your feelings about this liturgical springtime. I love to use this hymn at the end of worship during Lent:

Put peace into each other's hands
And like a treasure hold it,
Protect it like a candle flame,
With tenderness enfold it.

Put peace into each other's hands
With loving expectation;
Be gentle in your words and ways,
In touch with God's creation.

Put peace into each other's hands
Like bread we break for sharing;
Look people warmly in the eye:
Our life is meant for caring.

Give thanks for strong -yet tender hands,
Held out in trust and blessing.
Where words fall short, let hands speak out,
The heights of love expressing.

Put Christ into each other’s hands,
He is love’s deepest measure;
In love make peace, give peace a chance
And share it like a treasure

Fred Kaan© 1989 and 2001 Stainerand Bell

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Atlas

I bought an atlas yesterday. It was a spontaneous purchase at the local U-Haul where my husband and I were picking up more packing and moving supplies. Our big move back to the Midwest takes place next week, the end result of our lease being up here and my ongoing job search. It will be good to be back in Chicago, even if only temporarily. We have family to see, my aging mother in law, my brother with cancer, and our daughter, who we will live with. We have restaurants we want to visit and friends to see. It will be good even as it will be difficult. The atlas will help us get there, although that's not really why I bought it. I've made the trip numerous times, this will be my third in less than six months. So, I know the route, and the stopping places, the gas stations and places to eat. No. I bought the atlas for another reason.

Ok. Actually I did buy it for part of the trip. I have been confused several times on the toll road through Oklahoma. Mapquest will tell me to take a particular toll road, but I have missed it several times and ended up on another one. It seems both toll roads run (mostly) parallel to each other so I am uncertain why one and not the other? It seems that one is "local" and the other is "express." One has more toll stops but is less expensive, the other has fewer toll stops but is more expensive. Anyway I wanted the atlas to help me put it all in perspective.

I also bought the atlas because the one I had for ten or more years fell apart on my last road trip to Chicago. And, I've missed it. Google maps and mapquest are good for giving me the details of an area, a neighborhood, a city, or even a route. But it's hard for me to get the big picture of city within a state or a state within the country from my computer. I like to put it all in perspective.

This Lent, as I did two years ago, I will be moving. Literally moving across country. It's a strange way to spend Lent - packing, loading trucks, driving across country in uncertain weather conditions, and hoping it won't be that bad. Moving for Lent offers plenty of opportunity for reflection and the potential for significant transformation. But just what that all will mean remains uncertain. It is after all a journey, whether its Lent to Easter or the SE desert to the Midwest. The fruit of this journey will only be known on the other side. An atlas can help me get there. An atlas can help me see the bigger picture. But an atlas cannot tell me everything. Somethings just have to wait to be revealed.

Monday, February 15, 2010

Nothing is Impossible. The word itself says, ‘I’m Possible’. (Audrey
Hepburn) from wainida

Monday Morning Musings

This morning I am relaxing with a cup of coffee as I reflect on the year past, and the potential for the year ahead. It's my birthday today, so a good time for this reflection.

The past year has been one of the most challenging I've ever faced. But there is some hope for the coming year, and for that I gave thanks.

Today, though I am in the midst of a house that is adjusting to the new girl my son brought home. Yes, that's her photo in my header. A friend of a friend was giving away a puppy and he took her. She's very sweet and smart - learns fast! But my household is all wonky adjusting to her. The older momma dogs are doing well enough - a little stressed - but mostly ok. The cats are a bit put out. Especially my sons cat - who is a black mini version of the dog. She seems the most upset and recently smacked the puppy, claws out. No harm done, except to the puppy's ego.

Later today my son will head north with the puppy, back to school. And my house will return to a quieter pace.

I anticipate a relatively quiet day. A late breakfast with our son before he leaves, a massage, and then a dinner with my husband. I'm sure we'll do some Olympic watching too.

That's my day. How about yours?

Saturday, February 13, 2010

More Questions

LXXII by Pablo Neruda

If all the rivers are sweet
how does the sea get its salt?

How do the seasons know
they must change their shirt?

Why so slowly in winter
and later with such a rapid shudder?

And how do the roots know
they must climb toward the light?

And then greet the air
with so many flowers and colors?

Is it always the same spring
who revives her role?

Friday, February 12, 2010

Knitting Olympics

I registered just in time, for the knitting Olympics....you can read about it on Mary Beths Blog. Suffice it to say I'm making a pair of socks. The challenge will be completing them in the time frame of the olympics, especially since we are moving from Feb. 24-March 1....meaning, they really need to be finished on Feb. 23. Yikes. And I can't start for another couple of hours...

RevGals Friday Five Meme: Fab-February

Jan over at RevGals posts this fabulous Friday Five:

1. When February comes along, how do you feel about the coming month? Well, as February is my birthday month... and since I was born the day after Valentine's Day..I tend to like February. I enter the month with a sense of hopefullness for the coming year. And, I started blogging three years ago in anticipation of my 50th birthday and have been blogging ever since - which has definitely been a fun thing to do - and created a whole new life for me with a group of fabulous blogging friends!

2. What memories do you have about Valentine's Day? Are you doing anything to observe it this year? I really loved making Valentines Day boxes out of old shoe boxes. I had fun creating them and I was really concerned with giving everyone in my class a card - and often a little gift as well. Sometimes I'd tape a lollipop to the cards or include candy hearts.

Also, my husband and I got engaged on Valentines Day, 25 years ago. We went to this cozy fireside champagne jazz bar in Chicago to celebrate the night. I don't think either one of us when there with the intention of getting engaged that night - but our conversation definitely led in that direction and so we did. We even set the date that night....for six months later.

3. It is interesting that Monday's "Presidents Day" is not officially called that in every state. It is a U.S. federal holiday entitled "Washington's Birthday." Which is your favorite president and why? I don't know that I have a favorite President....Lincoln of course is significant. And since I lived in Illinois for many years I went to Springfield and visited his house and learned a lot about his life. I also really like Bill Clinton - perhaps because he is the first President I voted for that won and I had such high hopes for him. And, then also, I have similar feelings about Obama - hopeful for his presidency and what his leadership can do for this broken country of ours.

4. Will you be celebrating Shrove Tuesday or Mardi Gras? How? This year, neither....sigh... my husband is working and I won't be at church for the pancake supper. BUT do get to Preside at the 7pm Ash Wed. service...and am grateful for that.

5. Any other ways to celebrate in February? Hey! My birthday, of course...which will last a long time - mostly because my real celebration will take place once we are back in Chicago....I have a couple of favorite restaurants I want to go too....

Bonus: A Lenten book or website you recommend. I like Barbara Brown Taylor's book, "Speaking of Sin" for Lent....

Tuesday, February 09, 2010

Another Question

See my previous post for more about Pablo Neruda's poems...

XXXIII

And why is the sun such a bad companion
to the traveler in the desert?

And why is the sun so congenial
in the hospital garden?

Are they birds or fish
in these nets of moonlight?

Was it where they lost me
that I finally found myself?

The Book of Questions

One of the books I bought on impulse the other day was Pablo Neruda's "The Book of Questions." It's poetry book of questions. Here's an example:

LXVII

Can you love me, syllabary,
and give me a meaningful kiss?

Is a dictionary a sepulchre
or a sealed honeycomb?

In which window did I remain
watching buried time?

Or is what I see from afar
what I have not yet lived?

Each poem is presented in its English translation and the original Spanish.

The inside cover says this: In The Book of Questions, Pablo Neruda refuses to be corralled by the rational mind. Composed entirely of unanswerable couplets, the poems integrate the wonder of a child with the experiences of an adult. Whether comic, surreal, or Orphic, Neruda's poignant questions lead the reader beyond reason into realms of sudden intuition and pure imagination.

It's a delightful little book.

Monday, February 08, 2010

The Night Traveler

Passing by, he could be anybody:
A thief, a tradesman, a doctor
On his way to a worried house.
But when he stops at your gate,
Under the room where you lie half-asleep,
You know it is not just anyone -
It is the Night Traveler.

You lean your arms on the sill
And stare down. But all you can see
Are bits of wilderness attached to him -
Twigs, loam, and leaves,
Vines and blossoms. Among these
You feel his eyes, and his hands
Lifting something in the air.

He has a gift for you, but it has no name.
It is windy and wooly.
He holds it in the moonlight, and it sings
Like a newborn beast,
Like a child at Christmas,
Like your own heart as it tumbles
In love's green bed.
You take it, and he is gone.

All night - and all your life, if you are willing -
It will nuzzle your face, cold-nosed,
Like a small white wolf;
It will curl in your palm

Like a hard blue stone;
It will liquify into a cold pool
Which, when you dive into it,
Will hold you like a mossy jaw.
A bath of light. An answer.

Mary Oliver: from Twelve Moons: 1979
found in New and Selected Poems, Volume One Beacon Press, 1992

Monday Morning Musings

This Monday, as I watch the news and read blogs and facebook, I am wishing we lived in the area where they are having a snow day.

I know. Call me silly.

But, it's true.

Saturday, February 06, 2010

Last

I am in the process of living through a series of "last time"...the last time I will have lunch with this particular group of women clergy. The last time I will see this massage therapist. The last time I will see this acupuncturist. The last time I will take this walk. The last time I will make this drive. And so on.

Much of my energy has been focused on finding the date when we will move and thus establishing this cycle of "last time." Now that we have that date, and the truck has been ordered, and the packing is in full swing, the lasts are all happening too.

Yesterday I drove, for the last time, the beautiful back road desert drive, to my Spiritual Director's house. You may remember that my SD here is the same SD I saw for many years when I lived in Chicago. I began having monthly visits with her when I was in seminary, 15 years ago. We continued long after seminary and through my first two calls as a priest. Then, about five years ago she retired and moved west. We said our goodbye's and I supposed she was gone from my life, except for the occasional card or email now and then.

That is until I move out here too. Almost two years ago, to the day, I arrived in this desert SE area. And within about a month I was back to having monthly meeting with my SD. We picked up, after some three years, where we left off. I filled her in on all that had happened in my life and vocation. And over the last two years she has been a staple and a grounding force in an otherwise barren prickly place.

As I left her yesterday I gave her a hug and said, "Goodbye, for now." and then I said, "I suspect our paths will cross again, somewhere, someplace." She laughed and said "Yes, I suspect they will."

Somethings end. And some things last...

Friday, February 05, 2010

RevGals Friday Five: Pointing Toward Spring...

(Photo of a hummingbird moth in lavender, from my backyard)

Sally over at RevGals offers this Friday Five Meme wondering what to do on a rainy day that points toward Spring...

1. Exercise, what do you do if you can't face getting out into the cold and damp? I have a routine that includes rotating through the week: twenty minutes of core ab work plus bicep/tricep with weights; two twenty minute yoga routines (one for morning and one for afternoon); an indoor exercise bike; and two yoga DVD's with 60 minute and 96 minutes practices. Using one, or a series of these, gives me ways to move when I'm stuck indoors.

2. Food; time to comfort eat, or time to prepare your body for the coming spring/summer? I don't do much comfort eating. But like my cycle of exercise I have a daily "practice" of must have dietary needs: Morning - coffee. After several cups of coffee I usually have a big bowl of plain yogurt with honey and granola. Afternoon: dark chocolate and Earl Grey tea. Dinner: a glass of wine with dinner. Late night: herbal tea and a cookie. Throughout the day - lots of water.

3. Brainpower; do you like me need to stave off depression, if so how do you do it? These days I am totally working hard to stave off depression....exercise is a big part of it. Meditating helps. Blogging is essential. And, hopefully, a good night's sleep.

4. How about a story that lifts your spirits, is there a book or film that you return to to stave off the gloom? Lately: watching movies like "Serendipity" or "Sleepless in Seattle" or, even, "The Count of Monte Cristo" - over coming adversity with humor and love...or reading books: recently "Eat, Pray, Love" and "People of the Book"...but nothing that I automatically turn too.

5. Looking forward, do you have a favourite spring flower/ is there something that says spring is here more than anything else? Tulips, Lilacs, and:

Bonus; post a poem/ piece of music that points to the coming spring......

Spring: Mary Oliver

Somewhere
a black bear
has just risen from sleep
and is staring

down the mountain.
All night
in the brisk and shallow restlessness
of early spring

I think of her,
her four black fists
flicking the gravel,
her tongue

like a red fire
touching the grass,
the cold water.
There is only one question:

how to love this world.
I think of her
rising
like a black and leafy ledge

to sharpen her claws against
the silence
of the trees.
Whatever else

my life is
with its poems
and its music
and its cities,

it is also this dazzling darkness
coming
down the mountain,
breathing and tasting;

all day I think of her -—
her white teeth,
her wordlessness,
her perfect love.

Wednesday, February 03, 2010

Letting Go

When I left St. Homeostasis a few months ago I received some good advice from a colleague, the Jungian Priest. He said, "It's a sick church, let it go."

Letting go seems to be a theme in my life these days, something I blogged about in my post yesterday on the yoga DVD Gravity and Grace. A day later I find myself thinking more about this:

"In letting go, by relaxing into the postures, one builds strength, stamina, and flexibility. Counter-intuitive, perhaps. But I think there is great wisdom in that principle which can be applied to life in many ways - letting go, breathing, relaxing into the posture, the situation, or whatever life throws at us - builds us up. Letting go is not the same thing as collapsing or giving up, letting go is a process of holding a very difficult posture/life experience while at the same time breathing, relaxing into it, and letting go."

This process of letting go, as I describe above, is a process of working through resistance. Stiff muscles are resistant to stretching. One does not force muscles to stretch - doing so only causes muscles to tear. Force causes injury.

When I was a massage therapist, after years of giving treatments, I finally realized that the proper approach to tight muscles was not increasing the pressure and force of the treatment. Instead the same principle applies: hold steady pressure at just the right degree, not too much nor too little (discerned by asking the client how the pressure feels on a scale of 1-10 - the appropriate pressure should be at about a 7). And while the therapist holds steady pressure the client breaths, slowly, in and out, until the sensation of the pressure/pain eases and the tense area releases.

Yes. It works. Yoga helped me realize this. Holding yoga postures is the same thing - holding a posture to just the degree that it causes some strain, but not enough to injure or hurt. Hold it while breathing, and the muscle will relax and stretch with the breath. Stretching, holding and ultimately releasing causes the muscle to become stronger.

When life throws us challenges our natural response is to become defensive. The natural defenses we exhibit will vary depending on the situation. Sometimes the defense is denial. Sometimes its anger. Sometimes its grief. Sometimes its self-righteousness. These are all feelings and valid. Defenses serve a purpose by protecting us in fragile moments. But defenses can also become limitations. For example defenses that worked for us when we were children may no longer work for us as adults. The feelings can take over our lives and control us, thus limiting us. The feelings can narrow our vision. Sometimes our defenses define us in unhelpful ways. Eventually there comes a time when we need to examine our defenses and assess their healthiness and impact on our overall well being.

This process of self-examination may then lead to a process of letting go. And here is where we learn to meet our internal resistance with gentle firmness, with breath, stretching, letting go, becoming stronger, and ultimately finding balance.

Tuesday, February 02, 2010

Gravity and Grace



Yesterday I practiced, for the second time, the 96 minute sequence of the Hatha Yoga DVD, Gravity and Grace. This time it was a little less weird but still very hard. I do not think of myself as a beginner in yoga practice, but this DVD makes me feel like a novice, and points out just how stiff my (almost) 53 year old body really is. Granted, I am a lot less stiff than I was four months ago or a year ago. And by some standards I'm pretty flexible, even for my age. What I like about the DVD is that I come out of the practice feeling like I had a real work out - slow, intense, deep, powerful. And I suspect as I practice this for the next year or so it will slowly become less weird and less difficult. And maybe I'll become more flexible and strong. That is the point of Gravity and Grace, flexibility and strength, and stamina. It's the idea built on the principle of "letting go."

In letting go, by relaxing into the postures, one builds strength, stamina, and flexibility. Counter-intuitive, perhaps. But I think there is great wisdom in that principle which can be applied to life in many ways - letting go, breathing, relaxing into the posture, the situation, or whatever life throws at us - builds us up. Letting go is not the same thing as collapsing or giving up, letting go is a process of holding a very difficult posture/life experience while at the same time breathing, relaxing into it, and letting go.

So, is it a coincidence that I bought, and am practicing, a yoga DVD called Gravity and Grace (or is it Grace and Gravity?) at this time in my life? Is it a coincidence that I practice "letting go" while at the same being in the midst of profound tension?

I think probably not.

I also think that this yoga practice is grounding me in some wonderful ways, it is the gravity that holds me in balance these days. And in that there is grace.

(Oh, and you can purchase the DVD at amazon

Grace and Gravity, again

Yesterday I practiced, for the second time, the 96 minute sequence of the Hatha Yoga DVD, Grace and Gravity (or is it Gravity and Grace?). This time it was a little less weird but still very hard. I do not think of myself as a beginner in yoga practice, but this DVD makes me feel like a novice, and points out just how stiff my (almost) 53 year old body really is. Granted, I am a lot less stiff than I was four months ago or a year ago. And by some standards I'm pretty flexible, even for my age. What I like about the DVD is that I come out of the practice feeling like I had a real work out - slow, intense, deep, powerful. And I suspect as I practice this for the next year or so it will slowly become less weird and less difficult. And maybe I'll become more flexible and strong. That is the point of Gravity and Grace, flexibility and strength, and stamina. It's the idea built on the principle of "letting go."

In letting go, by relaxing into the postures, one builds strength, stamina, and flexibility. Counter-intuitive, perhaps. But I think there is great wisdom in that principle which can be applied to life in many ways - letting go, breathing, relaxing into the posture, the situation, or whatever life throws at us - builds us up. Letting go is not the same thing as collapsing or giving up, letting go is a process of holding a very difficult posture/life experience while at the same time breathing, relaxing into it, and letting go.

So, is it a coincidence that I bought, and am practicing, a yoga DVD called Gravity and Grace (or is it Grace and Gravity?) at this time in my life? Is it a coincidence that I practice "letting go" while at the same being in the midst of profound tension?

I think probably not. I also think that this yoga practice is grounding me in some wonderful ways, it is the gravity that holds me in balance these days. And in that there is grace.

I think not.

Monday, February 01, 2010

Monday Morning Musings

Yesterday I had a wonderful morning at BitS (Back in the Saddle) Church. I'm going to miss that place and the fine people who work and worship there. Afterward my husband and I took the dogs out. The house we live in is "on the market" and the realtor had an open house. Which means we spent hours prepping the house and making it look pretty. Not easy when half the house is packed and the other half is in varying stages of being packed. Anyway, we had to disappear for two hours. Our first stop, of course, was dog park. Lots of dogs were there as well, so everyone had a good time. After about 70 minutes of dog park we loaded up the dogs and headed over to Starbucks for a coffee. That was delightful too. My husband and I rarely go out "just for coffee." When we returned to the house a stream of people were still coming in and out. Turns out there had been over 40 people through the house. 2/3 of those, apparently, are just the Sunday afternoon loafers and curiosity seekers. But the other 1/3 are looking. We are hoping, for the sake of our fine landlords, that this house sells quickly. If you've been a long time reader of this blog you know how much we have loved living here.

So this morning I am relaxing in a very clean house with very little on my agenda. I think I'll practice that weird Hatha Yoga DVD again...assuming that the more I do it the less weird it will feel. I'll walk the dogs, do some knitting, maybe watch a movie, and look for some books to download on my iPod for the long drive north. We leave in 27 days.

That's all I'm musing on this morning. What about you?

Resting on the Spiritual Porch

I have a good friend who is always late for everything. Whenever my friend and I schedule a date to get together I plan to arrive 15 minute...